Irish Hill Lists & GPS Waypoints

View All Irish Hills by Area

Use an interactive map of the Irish areas to view ALL the hills in those areas.

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Marilyns 

Hills & Mountains of any height with a drop of at least 150 metres on all sides.
The geographical area includes the Isle of Man and the islands of St Kilda. (N.B. twin peak marilyns are not included here)


Hewitts 

Hills of England and Wales & Ireland over Two Thousand feet (with at least 30 metre drop on all sides).


Trail 100 

Trail's Top 100 Hills; a list of 100 hills published in Trail Magazine in 2007 which has become popularised by becoming the objective of the WaterAid Trail 100 charity challenge.


HuMPs 

Hills of any height with a drop of at least 100 metres or more on all sides. The name HuMP stands for Hundred Metre Prominence. (All Marilyns are HuMPs) The original source for the HuMPs list was Dr Eric Yeaman's "Handbook of the Scottish Hills", published by Wafaida in 1989. Clem Clements applied Yeaman's original criteria to England and Wales, and christened the results "Yeomans".


Historic County tops 

The highest point within (or sometimes on) the boundary of each county. Based on the traditional list of counties from which people usually take their local cultural identity. Note that these were never abolished, they just ceased to have administrative function.


Dillons 

Hills in Ireland at least 2000 feet high published in The Mountains of Ireland. There is no prominence criterion. Both the Dillons and the Hewitts have 212 hills, but 13 hills in each list do not appear in the other.


P30 TUMPs 

TUMPs or P30s are hills of any height with a drop of at least 30 metres or more on all sides. The name TUMP stands for Thirty & Upward Metres Prominence.


Irish "Munros" 

Irish 3000 ft Mountains; aka Irish Munros


Irish "Corbetts" 

Irish Marilyns (i.e. a drop of at least 150m) with heights between 762m & 913m


Furth Munros 

The Furths comprise summits which are generally recognised as being the 3000ft peaks of the British Isles 'furth' of Scotland (furth meaning outside). These are the equivalent of the 'Munros' of England, Ireland and Wales.


Vandeleur-Lynams

Hills in Ireland at least 600 metres high with a drop of at least 15 metres on all sides.


Arderins

Hills in Ireland at least 500 metres high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides. The name comes from the 527m hill which is the County Top for both Laois and Offaly and means, from the Irish, "Height of Ireland". This list effectively amalgamates the Irish Hewitts and Myrddyn Deweys.


Myrddyn Deweys

Irish equivalent of the Deweys - hills with at least 500m high and below 609.6m with a drop of at least 30m on all sides.


Carns

Carns are hills in Ireland between 400 and 499.9m high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides as defined by MountainViews, based on a list originally supplied to the Mountaineering Council of Ireland by Myrddyn Phillips. The name comes from Carn Hill, Cnoc an Chairn, "hill of the cairn" in the Sperrins.


Major Mountains of the UK (P600m )

The P600m Peaks - a list of British and Irish hills with at least 600m of prominence. For more information, visit Mark Trengove's Europeaklist website and see the PDF at the bottom of the page.


P500m Prominent Peaks

The P500m Peaks - a list of British and Irish hills with at least 500m of prominence. For more details see Jim Bloomer and Roddy Urquhart's website


Really Big Hills of UK (P609m)

The P609m Peaks - a list of British and Irish hills with at least 2000 feet of prominence. For more details see http://sucs.org/~baronson/bagging/


Sub-Marilyns

hills that narrowly fall short of meeting the Marilyn list's classification threshold


Sub-HuMPs

Hills falling short of being HuMPs on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-Myrddyn Deweys

Hills falling short of being Myrddyn Deweys on drop by 10m or less.


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