Hill Lists & GPS Waypoints

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Administrative County tops 

The highest point within (or sometimes on) the boundary of each county. Based on the redrawn administrative boundaries and introduction of Metropolitan Counties in the mid 1970s. These began to be abolished in the 1990s.


Archies 

The Archies are all the mountains of Scotland with a summit of 1000m or more also having a 100m height drop between the top and the surrounding land.


Arderins 

Hills in Ireland at least 500 metres high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides. The name comes from the 527m hill which is the County Top for both Laois and Offaly and means, from the Irish, "Height of Ireland". This list effectively amalgamates the Irish Hewitts and Myrddyn Deweys.


B-SQUIBs 

Islands between 10 and 30 hectares with less than 30m of prominence. Known as B-SIBs prior to August 2018 when the list was extended to include Ireland, Isle of Man and the Channel Isles.
Listed by Alan Holmes


Binnions 

The Binnions are irish hills below 400m with 150m drop. The list is not identical to the subset of Marilyns below 400m.


Birketts 

Lake District hills over 1,000ft listed in Bill Birkett's Complete Lakeland Fells


Bridge's 2000ft Hills 

An historical list of 2000-foot summits of England and Wales compiled by Bridge (1973). The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision.


Buxton and Lewis  

From the Buxton & Lewis (1986) historical list of the 2000-foot summits of England and Wales. The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision.


Carns 

Carns are hills in Ireland between 400 and 499.9m high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides as defined by MountainViews, based on a list originally supplied to the Mountaineering Council of Ireland by Myrddyn Phillips. The name comes from Carn Hill, Cnoc an Chairn, "hill of the cairn" in the Sperrins.


Caton's Tidal Islands 

Tidal Islands, listed in No Boat Required, Exploring Tidal Islands, Peter Caton, 2011. Definition: A named area of land of significant size, which supports vegetation, shows signs of human activity, can be safely walked to with dry feet at least once a month from the UK mainland, is totally surrounded by water on a minimum of one tide each month, but never totally submerged.


Clems

After the publication of Dr Eric Yeaman's Handbook of the Scottish Hills (Wafaida, 1989), E.D. 'Clem' Clements set out to extend Yeaman's criteria to England and Wales. Clem's original handwritten list, completed in the early 1990s, comprised 1284 hills.

The process of verifying and digitising this handwritten document took many years and involved numerous contributors, notably Rob Woodall, Myrddyn Phillips, Gary Honey, Gordon Adshead and Iain Cameron; Clem made some additions to the list in 2004 bringing the total to 1298 hills, and this list later formed the basis for later HuMP research.

Clem himself referred to hills on his list as 'Yeomans', but here they have been renamed 'Clems' in his honour by way of remembering the man and recognising his achievement.


Combined SIBs B-SQUIBs and Q-SQUIBs

All the SIBs, B-S QUIBs and Q-SQUIBs together. Listed by Alan Holmes. The Haroldstreet listings do not currently include Ireland, Isle of Man and the Channel Isles which were added in August 2018


Corbett Tops (All)

Subsidiary summits of Munros and Corbetts between 2500 and 2999 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.


Corbett Tops on Corbetts

Subsidiary summits of Corbetts between 2500 and 2999 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.


Corbett Tops on Munros

Subsidiary summits of Munros between 2500 and 2999 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.


Corbett Twenty Fives

first published in The Rucksack Club Journal 1911 (based on Bartholomew Map), 1912 update , 1929 (based on OS 1 inch map and 50 foot contours) and 1933 update. The first ever bagging list for England and Wales.


Corbetts

Corbetts - Scottish hills between 2500 and 2999 feet high with a drop of at least 500 feet (152.4m) on all sides. (making them a sub-set of the Marilyns too)


Current County and Unitary Authority tops

The highest point within (or sometimes on) the boundary of each county. Based on the list of Counties, Metropolitan Districts and Unitary Authorities that came into existence in the 1990s, and are still changing.


Dewey's Notable Tops

The "Notable Hill Tops of England and Wales" were included in the Mountain Tables by Michael Dewey published 1995 by Constable, along with his better-known 500m hill list. The Notables are all in England and Wales, generally outside the main high mountain/moor areas.
(52 of the hills in this list are in addition to those hills sourced from the DoBIH, the other 280 link to the DoBIH Hill/Tump details.)


Deweys

Hills in England, Wales and the Isle of Man at least 500m high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides. The list was published with no upper bound on height, but in practice the name is applied to hills below 610m (2000ft) high, as hills over 610m are usually called Hewitts.


Dillons

Hills in Ireland at least 2000 feet high published in The Mountains of Ireland. There is no prominence criterion. Both the Dillons and the Hewitts have 212 hills, but 13 hills in each list do not appear in the other.


Dodds

The Dodds (hills in Scotland, Wales and England of height 500-599.9m with at least 30m of drop) have been added. The list was originally proposed in 2014 as a metric alternative to the British 500m lists and has been adopted by the Relative Hills Society


Donald Deweys

Scottish Lowland equivalent of the Deweys - hills with at least 500m high and below 609.6m with a drop of at least 30m on all sides. (see also the Highland Fives)


Donald Tops

'Tops' relating to Donald Hills


Donalds

Hills in the Scottish Lowlands at least 2000 feet high. 'Tops' are all elevations with a drop of at least 100 feet (30.48m) on all sides and elevations of sufficient topographical merit with a drop of between 50 and 100 feet. Certain of these are designated 'Hills' according to a complex formula based on both distance and drop.


Double SubFours/Pedwarau

The list of English and Welsh hills which don't make "Four/Pedwar" status on two counts as they are between 20m and 29.9m of prominence AND height between 390m and 399.9m.
Further details at Mapping Mountains Publications


Elmslies

first published in The Journal of the Fell and Rock Climbing Club of the English Lake District 1933 in an article “The Two Thousand Footers of England” by W T Elmslie. The first attempt at a 2,000 foot bagging list for England and excludes 42 non summits from the original list of 347 points. The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision.


Falkingham 2,000 ft Tops of England

A list of 349 2000-foot summits in England published in the 1966 Gritstone Club Journal by F. G. Falkingham in an article entitled 'The 2,000 ft. Tops Of England'. The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision. Reference: Gritstone Club Journal 1966


Fellrangers

The Fellrangers a Lake District list for which the LDWA has created a Hillwalkers Register


Fours

A 'Four' is a hill in England between the heights of 400 metres and 499 metres with a minimum drop of 30 metres. There are 296 such hills that cover the length of the country from the Cheviot Hills in the north, to Bodmin Moor in the south-west.
Further details at Mapping Mountains Publications


FRCC Lakeland Fells

Hills from the book 'The Lakeland Fells' published by the Fell and Rock Climbing Club in 1996, edited by June Parker and Tim Pickles, which seeks to identify all fells over 300 metres, with public access and lying within the Lake District National Park. Includes all 214 Wainwrights, several additional low prominence high peaks, and all LDNP summits over 300m and P80m. Over 610m the effective cutoff is P40m, with all but 11 of the 114 LDNP Hewitts anticipated (P610m / P30m, published 1997), and 123 of the 171 LDNP Nuttalls (610m / P15m, published 1990) included.


Fundamental Benchmarks

An FBM consists of an underground chamber topped with a short granite pillar. They are located in geologically stable locations, and formed the basis of Britain's level control network. They have been superceded by GPS. Tick off your Fundamental Benchmarks using the check-boxes below...


Furth Munros

The Furths comprise summits which are generally recognised as being the 3000ft peaks of the British Isles 'furth' of Scotland (furth meaning outside). These are the equivalent of the 'Munros' of England, Ireland and Wales.


Gillhams

Mountains of Snowdonia from John Gillham's A Pictorial Guide to the Mountains of Snowdonia


Graham Tops (All)

Subsidiary summits of Munros, Corbetts and Grahams between 2000 and 2499 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.


Graham Tops on Corbetts

Subsidiary summits of Corbetts between 2000 and 2499 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.


Graham Tops on Grahams

Subsidiary summits of Grahams between 2000 and 2499 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.


Graham Tops on Hewitts

The single subsidiary summit of the only Scottish Hewitt between 2000 and 2499 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.


Graham Tops on Munros

Subsidiary summits of Munros between 2000 and 2499 feet high with a drop of at least 30 metres on all sides.


Grahams

Graham Mountains: - A Graham is a hill from 610 metres to 761 metres high inclusive (2000-2499 feet), with a drop of at least 150 metres all round. Originally, Scottish hills in this height range were referred to as Elsies (short for Lesser Corbetts).


Halseys

Halseys are island trig pillars in Scotland, England, Wales and Ireland.
Halsey data provided by Alex Cameron


Hardys

Based on The Hardys - The UK's High Points, by Ian Hardy, first published 1997 www.thehardys.org
Consisting of Hill Range, Island and Administrative Area high points. Covers England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Isle of Man and Channel Isles In the case of Administrative Area high points, where Hardys are undefined, or the locations differ from those in DOBIH, the equivalent DOBIH hill is used.


Haswell-Smiths Island Summits

These are the highest points of the islands listed in The Scottish Islands by Hamish Haswell-Smith.
To qualify, islands need to have an area of at least 40 hectares and to be an island at all tide states.


Hewitts

Hills of England and Wales & Ireland over Two Thousand feet (with at least 30 metre drop on all sides).


Highland Fives

Scottish Highland equivalent of the Deweys - hills with at least 500m high and below 609.6m with a drop of at least 30m on all sides. (see also the Donald Deweys)


Historic County tops

The highest point within (or sometimes on) the boundary of each county. Based on the traditional list of counties from which people usually take their local cultural identity. Note that these were never abolished, they just ceased to have administrative function.


HUGHS

The HUGHS (Hills Under Graham Height in Scotland): Scotland's Best Wee Hills Under 2,000 Feet

Data provided by Alex Cameron with kind permission from Andrew Dempster.


HuMP Twin Peaks

A Twin HuMP is defined as a summit of equal height to another HuMP where the drop between the two summits is at least 30m but less than 100m.


HuMPs

Hills of any height with a drop of at least 100 metres or more on all sides. The name HuMP stands for Hundred Metre Prominence. (All Marilyns are HuMPs) The original source for the HuMPs list was Dr Eric Yeaman's "Handbook of the Scottish Hills", published by Wafaida in 1989. Clem Clements applied Yeaman's original criteria to England and Wales, and christened the results "Yeomans".


Island Summits

where height and prominence are the same


Jones's 2,000's of Wales

The Welsh 2000ft Summits by Robert Jones 1993.
The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision.


Lakes Minor Prominences

Minor hills in the Lake District National Park above 300m height, geographically distinctive, with prominence of less than 30m.
More information: LaMPs Document
 
Viewing the LaMPs and P30 TUMPs together is intended to provide a comprehensive listing of "significant" summits within the Lake District National Park, above 300m and/or 30m prominence.
See... www.haroldstreet.org.uk/waypoints/download/?list=tumps&list2=lamps&area=ldnp
 
The LaMPs is a collaborative list. If you find significant summits you consider to be worth adding, please let us know - they can be promoted via the Lakehills forum


Landranger Tops

The highest point on each of the OS 1:50k Landranger Maps, based on the Ray Barnes 2002 web list of Landranger Tops with futher additions and corrections. (Data courtesy of Chris Pearson + Rob Woodall).


Laws

Hill's called Law


London Borough tops

The highest point within (or sometimes on) the boundary of each London Borough.


MacPhies

A "MacPhie" is defined as an eminence in excess of 300ft in height, and is Colonsay's equivalent to a Munro, only smaller. The aim is to climb all the peaks on Colonsay and Oransay that exceed 300ft (91.46m), in the course of one connected walk. The journey has to start and finish with any point below High Water mark, and the "MacPhies" can be tackled in any order. There are 22 peaks in the Official List, and the distance is about 20 miles.


Major Mountains of the UK (P600m )

The P600m Peaks - a list of British and Irish hills with at least 600m of prominence. For more information, visit Mark Trengove's Europeaklist website and see the PDF at the bottom of the page.


Marilyn Twin Peaks

A Marilyn Twin Peak is a summit of equal height to another Marilyn where the drop between the two is less than 150m.


Marilyns

Hills & Mountains of any height with a drop of at least 150 metres on all sides.
The geographical area includes the Isle of Man and the islands of St Kilda. (N.B. twin peak marilyns are not included here)


Marsh

The 600-metre summits of England & Wales with a minimum drop of 30 metres from the four books by Terry Marsh: The Mountains of Wales (1985), The Lakes Mountains Vol 1 and 2 (1987) and The Pennine Mountains (1989) all published by Hodder & Stoughton. The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision.


Moss 2,000's of England and Wales

A list by Richard Moss, son of Edward (Ted) Moss resulting in the largest list of English and Welsh mountains over 2,000 feet. The list is based on those of FHF Simpson (1937, Wayfarers' Journal, 5, 18-24) and Edward (Ted) Moss (1940, RCJ, IX, 239-243; 1952, RCJ, XII, 67-70; 1954, RCJ, XII, 276). It includes all summits in:

  • "The Mountains of England and Wales" by George Bridge, 1973;
  • "The Mountains of England and Wales". Volume 1 Wales (1989) and Volume 2 England (1990) by John and Anne Nuttall;
  • "The Mountain Summits of England and Wales" by Chris Buxton and Gwyn Lewis, 1986;
  • "The Relative Hills of Britain" by Alan Dawson, 1992;
  • "English Mountain Summits" by Nick Wright, 1974.
  • "Mountain Tables" by Michael Dewey, 1995.
plus additional summits identified by both Ted and Richard Moss in their own research.

Published is the Rucksack Club Journal in 2007 All Those Two-Thousands (2007, RCJ, XXV (1) Issue 96, 111-117) and available online at www.cantab.net/users/remus/ and www.cantab.net/users/remus/usernote.html


Moss's

A list of 404 two thousand foot summits in England & Wales (excluding the English Lake District - see Simpson list) published in four articles in the Rucksack Club Journal by Edward ("Ted") Moss, between 1939 & 1954.
The list was defined by the original publications and is not subject to revision.


Munro Tops

Scottish 'Tops': - Munro Tops are subsidiary summits to Munros which although meeting the height criterion for a Munro are not deemed to be separate to be distinct Munros.


Munros

Scottish Munro Mountains - The Munros are the highest of Scotland's mountains, 282 mountain tops named after the man who first catalogued them, Sir Hugh Munro.
Revised down from 284: Beinn a'Chlaidheimh and Sgurr nan Ceannaichean have been surveyed as less than 3000ft and have been reclassified as Corbetts.


Murdos

Murdos: - A Murdo is a Scottish peak over 3000 feet with a drop of at least 30 metres (98 feet) all round. The Murdos comprise the main Munros and the most significant Munro Tops.


Myrddyn Deweys

Irish equivalent of the Deweys - hills with at least 500m high and below 609.6m with a drop of at least 30m on all sides.


Nuttalls

Hills & Mountains list maintained by John and Anne Nuttall and detailed in 'The Mountains of England and Wales' published by Cicerone Press. Includes all the Hewitts


Ordnance Survey Triangulation Pillars

GPS Waypoints of all UK Ordnance Survey Trig. Points


P30 TUMPs

TUMPs or P30s are hills of any height with a drop of at least 30 metres or more on all sides. The name TUMP stands for Thirty & Upward Metres Prominence.


P30m islands

All the islands with Prominence of 30m or more.


P500m Prominent Peaks

The P500m Peaks - a list of British and Irish hills with at least 500m of prominence. For more details see Jim Bloomer and Roddy Urquhart's website


Q-SQUIBs

Islands less than A10 and less than P30. Known as SIBLETs prior to August 2018 when the list was extended to include Ireland, Isle of Man and the Channel Isles.
Listed by Alan Holmes


Really Big Hills of UK (P609m)

The P609m Peaks - a list of British and Irish hills with at least 2000 feet of prominence. For more details see http://sucs.org/~baronson/bagging/


Relative Wainwrights

Mark Jackson's list of the Tumps (p30) of the Lake District over 1000ft as described in the LDWA's Hillwalkers' Register Annual Report 2011.
 
The Relative "Wainwrights" sees around 50 of Wainwright's peaks deleted from the list as having less than 30m drop and the promotion of around 53 'new' peaks (Tumps) with over 30m drop and above 1000 feet asl that never made Wainwrights original list. There are only two of the new additions that don't feature as either Birketts or Synges, namely: Oakhowe Crag (417m), High Rigg SE Top (339m).
List provided by Chris Pearson


Significant Islands of Britain

The SIBs are defined as naturally occuring land which at MHWS is completely surrounded by water with either an area of at least 10 hectares within the MHWS contour line or a prominence of at least 30 metres above MSL, or both, all man-made links and structures being discounted. They were researched by Alan Holmes. The DoBIH gives only the Main SIBs, which comprise all islands having an area of at least 30 hectares or a drop of at least 30 metres, excluding sea stacks, as we believe this category is of most interest to baggers.


SimmBeags

those 341 hills in Scotland 600m or higher with drop between 15m and 19.9m The list was compiled by Ken Whyte, with assistance from Bernie Hughes and surveying input from Alan Dawson


Simpson's 2000ft summits

A list of 225 2000-foot summits in the English Lake District published in the 1937 Wayfarer's Journal "Concerning Contours" article by FHF Simpson. The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision. Reference: p18-24 Wayfarer's Journal 1937


SiMS

SiMS: Six-hundred Metre Summits (600m+/P30m) a list of British 600m hills with at least 30 meters of prominence. For more details see http://www.rhb.org.uk/sims/


Sub-Dodds

Hills falling short of being Dodds on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-Donald Deweys

Hills falling short of being Donald Deweys on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-Graham Tops

Hills falling short of being Grahams on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-Hewitts

Hills falling short of being Hewitts on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-Highland Fives

Hills falling short of being Highland Fives on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-HuMPs

Hills falling short of being HuMPs on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-Marilyns

hills that narrowly fall short of meeting the Marilyn list's classification threshold


Sub-Marsh

133 summits which are over 600 metres but fail the 30 metre drop from the four books by Terry Marsh: The Mountains of Wales (1985), The Lakes Mountains Vol 1 and 2 (1987) and The Pennine Mountains (1989) all published by Hodder & Stoughton. The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision.


Sub-Murdos

Hills falling short of being Murdos on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-Myrddyn Deweys

Hills falling short of being Myrddyn Deweys on drop by 10m or less.


Sub-SIMs

Hills falling short of being SIMs on drop by 10m or less.


SubFours/Pedwarau

The list of English and Welsh hills which don't quite make "Four/Pedwar" status and are either: height between 400m and 499.9m, and 20m to 29.9m of prominence; or of height between 390m and 399.9m, and 30m of prominence.
Further details at Mapping Mountains Publications


Synges

Synge's Lakeland Summits - Hills from the book 'The Lakeland Summits' by Tim Synge: covers the whole of the Lake District national park.


Trail 100

Trail's Top 100 Hills; a list of 100 hills published in Trail Magazine in 2007 which has become popularised by becoming the objective of the WaterAid Trail 100 charity challenge.


Vandeleur-Lynams

Hills in Ireland at least 600 metres high with a drop of at least 15 metres on all sides.


Wainwrights

Hills & mountains of the Lake District volumes 1-7 of Wainwright's A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells. (Note the there are no qualification criteria for Wainwrights, the author sometimes gives a summit location that is not the highest point of the fell. Our policy is to take the location intended by Wainwright. The list is not subject to revision.)


Wainwrights Vol. 8

Hills around the Lake District listed in Wainwright's Book "Volume 8 The Outlying Fells of Lakeland".


Welsh 3000s

The famous Welsh 3000 ft Mountains; Snowdon / Yr Wyddfa (1,085 m), Garnedd Ugain / Crib y Ddysgl (1,065 m), Crib Goch (923 m), Elidir Fawr (924 m), Y Garn (947 m), Glyder Fawr (999 m), Glyder Fach (994 m), Tryfan (915 m), Pen yr Ole Wen (978 m), Carnedd Dafydd (1,044 m), Carnedd Llewelyn (1,064 m), Yr Elen (962 m), Foel Grach (976 m), Garnedd Uchaf (926 m), Foel-fras (942 m).
Also known as the "Welsh Munros".


Wright's 2000ft English Mountain Summits

A list of 345 2000-foot summits in England by Nick Wright published by Robert Hale & Co London in 1974. ISBN 0-7091-4560-8 The list was defined by the original publication and is not subject to revision.


Y Pedwarau

A 'Pedwar' is a hill in Wales between the heights of 400 metres and 499 metres that has a minimum drop of 30 metres. As there are some 447 such hills, and they are over 400 metres high, it seems fitting to name them 'Y Pedwarau' , as the Welsh word 'Pedwar' translates as 'Four'.
Further details at Europeaklist


Y Pellennig

Remotest Hills of Wales: a list of 166 hills where the summit is a minimum of 2.5km from the nearest paved public road with a minimum of 15m of drop. The list is named 'Y Pellennig', pellennig in Welsh means 'distant' or 'remote'.
Further details at Europeaklist


Yeamans

The hills listed by Dr Eric Yeaman in his Handbook of the Scottish Hills (Wafaida, 1989). There were 2441 hills in the original book, the first ever publication to prioritise relative over absolute height in its selection:
"For the purposes of this Handbook, a hill is defined as an eminence which has an ascent of 100m all round, or, failing that, is at least 5km (walking distance) from any higher point".

Dr Yeaman later circulated an update sheet with copies of his book, in which he identified 66 additional hills, 11 deletions and 6 substitutions, one of which was subsequently reversed, giving a final total of 2495 hills. Yeamans were effectively the precursor of HuMPs, often referred to as 'New Yeamans' in the early stages, but 351 non-HUMPS qualify by virtue of the 5km distance rule.


Some Other Lists & Formats...

Some other waypoint lists some of the above lists in other formats are also available...

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